Endoscopic procedures

Dr Eric Lee is accredited by the Conjoint Committee for the Recognition of Training in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy for the following endoscopic procedures:
Gastroscopy

 

A gastroscopy is a procedure in which a thin flexible tube with a camera at its tip (endoscope) is inserted through the mouth to examine the lining of the oesophagus, stomach and first part of the small intestine. It also allows the specialist to obtain biopsies from these areas which are then sent-off for examination under a microscope. Instruments can be passed through the endoscope to treat many abnormalities with little or no discomfort.

 

 

Colonoscopy

 

A colonoscopy is a procedure used to examine the lining of the large bowel using a flexible tube with a camera at its tip (colonoscope). There are many reasons for having a colonoscopy including blood in the stool, family history of colon cancer, a low blood count, or a persistent change in your bowel habit. During a colonoscopy, polyps may be detected and removed so as to reduce your risk of developing bowel cancer. The specialist may obtain biopsies which are then sent-off for examination under a microscope. Instruments can also be passed through the colonoscope to treat many abnormalities with little or no discomfort.

 

Endoscopic ultrasound

Endoscpoic ultrasound is a procedure that involves ultrasound attached to the tip of the endoscope that is inserted into the oesophagus, stomach and duodenum. This enables careful examination of the wall layers of the upper gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, gallbladder, bile duct, liver and mediastinum.

 

ERCP

 

ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography) is a procedure used to examine the bile duct and pancreatic duct (drainage tubes from the liver, gallbladder and pancreas). If abnormalities are found these can be treated at the same time. A flexible tube with a camera at its tip (duodenoscope) is inserted through your mouth into the first part of the small bowel. A small plastic tube is then inserted into the ducts and x-ray dye is injected to visualise your bile and/or pancreatic ducts. The muscle at the opening of your bile duct is often gently cut (sphincterotomy) so as to allow additional treatment such as removal of stones. A drainage tube (stent) may also be placed inside your bile duct / pancreatic duct as part of the procedure.

 

 

The information on this website is of a general nature only, may not apply to you, and is not a substitute for formal medical advice from your own doctor.© 2020 Dr Eric Y Lee